Brisbane’s Jan Murphy Gallery is now representing Sydney-based artist Celia Gullett.

Celia’s practice is guided by her interest in colour field paintings, abstraction and minimalism. The atmospheric surfaces of her paintings capture ephemeral experiences (particularly music) in a more permanent form. “Everything I do is centred around colour and surface,” Gullett said. “Visible depths in the paint are created by layering and reduction, to evoke a sense of diffused light, and the crystallisation of experience into paint.”

Celia builds up the surface of the painting through methodical layering, creating a luminosity from below the surface. Her latest work reflects an ongoing interest in surface; combining pigment with wax to remove reflection, she strips the colour to its purest state. In much the same way that the Dutch Masters worked, she builds up the surface of the painting through methodical layering, creating a luminosity from below the surface. She successfully partners colours, creating a dialogue between the physical and metaphysical properties of colour – one hue calling for the presence of another to complete the composition.

A life-long professional artist, Celia graduated from Sydney’s COFA with a Bachelor of Fine Arts Degree. In the past 10 years she has been exhibited in seven major solo shows at two of Australia’s most prestigious art galleries, Tim Olsen Gallery in Sydney and Hill Smith Gallery in Adelaide. Recently joining the artist stable at Art Equity, Celia will show her latest body of work in a solo exhibition in late 2014. She has been selected as a finalist in leading Australian art prizes including Mosman Art Prize, Fleurieu Water Prize and the Paddington Art Prize and has a depth of teaching experience in art and design. In 2005 she founded a painting school teaching historic techniques and principles of oil painting.

Celia is an artist with an extraordinary understanding of the medium and has an unrivalled ability to create works with a world-wide aesthetic appeal and intrinsic beauty.

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